I don’t know just when I decided to make a record. I’ve always kept a journal and I’ve always liked to fool around on the guitar and at some point songs started coming out. This didn’t seem unusual; everyone around me was writing songs.

When I was in school, I used to perform as often as possible. I like the energy of being in front of an audience, and again it just seemed natural, having grown up on the road a lot.

So I found myself in Boulder, Colorado. I ‘followed my heart’ out there. There’s a lot of music in Boulder and I got the idea that I should get my songs down on tape. I wasn’t thinking so much about making a record, I just had to unload. I certainly didn’t have any plan to launch a career or follow in anyone’s footsteps (I still don’t). This was a very modest and personal effort.

A year or so ago in Telluride, CO., in a borrowed house, I found a book called “Tomboy Bride”. The image of a young 19th century frontier woman striding wide open into a new life resonated deeply with me, and helped me identify my self in a new world. The song “Tomboy Bride” just came tumbling out.

The world of the high-powered music-biz doesn’t seem like much fun to me. I don’t like the image of my songs on the assembly line, slugging it out with other acts. And since I’ve made the record on my own, with the dogs and the crickets in Wendy Woo’s living room, I figured I’d release on my own, too (I’ve got a thousand of them in a cardboard box at the foot of my bed).

I mean – we invent ourselves … right?